EdTech
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/19/2017

A teacher in Texas used Facebook Live to bring lessons to her students when schools were closed following storm Harvey. Shanna Lumpkin used a mobile app to alert parents to the online lessons, which included reading the book "What Do You Do With a Problem?" by Kobi Yamada, which she had planned to read to students on their first day in the classroom.

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Facebook, mobile application, Harvey
9/18/2017

Rather than focusing on bullying prevention, school leaders should work to promote a positive school climate, asserts Nancy Willard, director of Embrace Civility in the Digital Age. In this commentary, she shares several steps to help achieve this goal, including the launch of a "kindness campaign."

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Nancy Willard
9/18/2017

Texas Instruments has announced a new robot designed for middle- and high-school instruction in science, technology, engineering and math. TI-Innovator Rover is expected to be available to schools in the US and Canada in the fall.

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Texas Instruments
9/18/2017

Minorities may be psyching themselves out of succeeding in science, technology, engineering and math fields, researchers from San Francisco State University say. Researchers have identified a "stereotype threat," in which people are concerned about reinforcing a negative stereotype, and have developed an online tutorial to help educate students about this phenomena.

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National Public Radio
9/18/2017

A "shout out" to Washington, D.C., public schools from comedian Dave Chappelle during Sunday night's Emmy Awards caused the hashtag #DCPublicSchools to trend on Twitter. The school system replied with tongue-in-cheek tweets of its own.

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Emmy Awards, Twitter, Dave Chappelle
9/15/2017

Providing K-12 students with technology had little impact on their learning outcomes; however, students did improve their computer proficiency because of the devices, according to a new paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research. Researchers said that computer-assisted learning and behavioral interventions showed some promise for increasing academic achievement.

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Campus Technology
9/15/2017

It can be difficult to say "no" to requests for your time in a way that delivers the message without hurting feelings, writes Deborah Grayson Riegel. She outlines 20 ways to gracefully turn down a request, with one example being, "Not this time, but thank you for thinking of me."

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Psychology Today
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Deborah Grayson Riegel
9/14/2017

This blog post highlights several education leaders' biggest worries that keep them up at night. Jim Roberts, superintendent at Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation in Indiana, says students' 24/7 access to each other via digital tools is a concern.

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SmartBrief/Education
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Jim Roberts
9/14/2017

In this podcast, math blogger and Desmos Chief Academic Officer Dan Meyer discusses assumptions surrounding personalized learning. The biggest assumption, he says, is that technology can replace the work of teachers.

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EdSurge
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Dan Meyer
9/13/2017

Glenn Hubbard and Tony O'Brien have overhauled their introductory economics textbook into a new software-type format that includes less text and more video, animations and interactive features, write Allison Schrager and Amy Wang. This article examines how the textbook of the future could be modeled more after this design and sold on a subscription basis.

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Quartz