K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/28/2017

More students in New York City are enrolling in college, but a report finds that many lower-income students are dropping out. The report from the Research Alliance for New York City Schools points to life challenges, the overwhelming costs of college and a lack of academic preparation as possible reasons for this trend.

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Chalkbeat
6/28/2017

Teen boys and girls experienced similar frequencies of digital dating abuse, but girls had increased odds of experiencing digital sexual coercion and expressing negative emotional responses, according to a study in the Journal of Adolescence. The findings were based on 2013-14 survey data involving 703 high-school students.

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dating abuse
6/28/2017

Cuts to Medicaid proposed in the Republican's health care plan could cost schools about $4 billion in funding -- money they use to hire staff and provide materials to help students with special needs and students from low-income families, according to a national superintendents association. Supporters of the measure say it will lower costs by making health care more efficient.

6/28/2017

Sixth- and seventh-grade students in a Maryland school district will begin using the enVision Math 2.0 program -- which aligns with the state's college- and career-readiness standards -- during the next school year. The program was used last year in area elementary schools and some parents were concerned it was too "abstract."

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The Baltimore Sun
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Maryland school district
6/28/2017

Assistive technology is enabling persons with disabilities to earn a living and enjoy independence through special computer keyboards, screens and other adaptive equipment. "Because a lot of them have those abilities; they just need a little bit of assistance," said Lauren Coyle, director of specialized programs at EP!C, an employer in Peoria, Ill.

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assistive technology
6/28/2017

A quarter of the students who participated in the Moody's Mega Math Challenge said it was a teacher who sparked their interest in math, while 51% said they were naturally attracted to the subject, according to a survey from The Moody's Foundation. The survey also showed that 64% of participants felt the most effective learning strategy was to understand the basic concepts behind the formulas.

6/27/2017

Secondary students at 20 New Zealand schools are using virtual reality and computer programs to visit countries to work on their language skills through the Immerseme program. The program is set up for nine languages -- including Japanese, Mandarin, Indonesian and English -- and allows students to use a computer or headset to practice a language in simulated situations, such as speaking French to order coffee in a Paris cafe.

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Radio New Zealand
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New Zealand
6/27/2017

Students from low-income families are more likely to benefit from summer reading programs, according to a study by MIT. Researchers found that about half of 6- to 9-year-olds had higher test scores after participating in such a program -- with the majority coming from low-income families.

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MIT
6/27/2017

David Krulwich, principal of a college preparatory school serving sixth through 12th grades in New York City, supports an apprenticeship model to support novice teachers, which he describes in his book, "The Artisan Teaching Model for Instructional Leadership." In this Q&A, Krulwich and his co-author Kenneth Baum describe an approach that relies on a teacher team leader and educator collaboration.

6/27/2017

The Collaborative for Student Success and Bellwether Education Partners worked with education experts to analyze the initial batch of Every Student Succeeds Act state accountability plans. They noted that the plans do not adequately address the needs of disadvantaged students -- including students of color, students with disabilities and English-language learners.