Food Retail
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/19/2018

Each time a product is touched in the supply chain -- in production, on the shelf or in between -- costs and availability are impacted. One of the most significant drivers that can cause an increase in product handling is simply the way a product is ordered. Retailers stand to gain from optimizing product flow through the supply chain. Ordering the right quantities of product can impact operational costs like labor, workplace injuries, product damage, storage and floor space.

Presented by FMI and CHEP, join us as we discuss:

  • Specific operational and environmental savings that can be achieved throughout the supply chain while ensuring days-on-hand targets are met.
  • Order patterns that impact labor inefficiencies, causing product to be "case picked."
  • The importance of a stable unit load.

This free webinar will be held today at 2 p.m. Eastern. Register now.

Full Story:
fmi.org
9/19/2018

The grower-owners of New York's Crunch Time Apple Growers are turning out higher volumes of the RubyFrost and SnapDragon varieties this year. The company licenses the rights to grow, market and sell the varieties, which were developed by Susan Brown, an apple breeder at Cornell University.

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Susan Brown, Cornell University
9/19/2018

New varieties and hardier plants are helping US blackberry growers extend the season a bit more each year. Berry farmers in California and North Carolina have two growing seasons annually, and the current fall season could extend into October, while Mexico's blackberry season is off to a slower-than-usual start.

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North Carolina, Mexico, California
9/19/2018

Cyclospora was detected in two romaine lettuce samples from McDonald's, but the pathogens were not part of the outbreak linked to the chain's salads, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Some 2,173 cyclosporiasis cases have been confirmed in the US this spring and summer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

9/19/2018

Australia will change the law to increase the maximum penalty for people convicted of contaminating food to 15 years in jail, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said this week. The change comes as officials continue to seek the culprit in a growing wave of reports of needles and pins found in strawberries.

Full Story:
Reuters
9/19/2018

A Utica, N.Y., project called Food2Energy seeks to transform food waste from restaurants, colleges and other places into energy. The Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority will build a $3.4 million facility set to open in 2019 to process the food waste, and organizations can dispose of food scraps there at $20 less than the usual rate of $62 per ton.

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Solid Waste Authority
9/19/2018

Winegrapes are growing well on Colorado's western slope despite a hot and dry summer, vintners in the state say. Colorado is home to over 150 wineries, and Cassidee Shull of the Colorado Association for Viticulture and Enology says several vintners are new to the industry.

Full Story:
KDVR-TV (Denver)
9/19/2018

TEXSOM has grown to become one of the year's biggest wine events, drawing 1,300 wine professionals, who aim to learn from one another and taste new offerings. "It's easier to get better at your job in a room full of people who all want to be better, too," said master sommelier June Rodil.

Full Story:
Texas Monthly online
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June Rodil
9/19/2018

Truman & Orange has debuted a trio of Grace du Roi sparkling wines alongside a pair of Grace du Roi Methode Cap Classiques. "Using grapes chosen for their balance of sweetness and acidity and harvested at night to maintain their freshness, Grace du Roi sparkling wines offer a lively bubble, and a refreshing green apple and pear character, while the rose variants offer a hint of raspberry and cream," said Truman & Orange founding owner Rowan Leibbrandt.

Full Story:
IOL (South Africa)
9/19/2018

Australian millennial consumers seem to lean toward drinks that are refreshing, even when they choose wine, per consumer data from Treasury Wine Estates. This could mean a long-term boom in demand for rose and fizzy wine styles, Thomas Pellechia writes.

Full Story:
Forbes