News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/25/2017

A recent analysis found that 79% of accountable care organizations participating in Track 1 of the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2015 would have done better financially if they had been in Track 2 instead. The remaining 21% would have taken a loss in Track 2, which requires more financial risk, but the 5% bonus payment through the Quality Payment Program would have mitigated the loss, according to the analysis.

7/25/2017

Yesterday, ACNM joined every major patients' rights group in the country in taking out a full-page ad in The New York Times to urge a "No" vote on repeal of the Affordable Care Act. View the ad.

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facebook.com
7/25/2017

The Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center in Virginia Beach has put satellite and acoustic tags on loggerhead, green sea and Kemp's ridley turtles each year since 2013 as part of a Navy program to understand sea turtles' migration and habitat use. The Navy needs the information to understand how its operations might be affecting sea turtles, said Joel Bell, senior marine resources specialist at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic.

7/25/2017

Nearly 90% of patients are offered access to medical records online by their health care providers, but two-thirds of patients do not use them because they are frustrated with the amount of time and effort needed to manage passwords and understand the user interfaces of different providers' portals, according to a Government Accountability Office report. In addition, patients often find the information incomplete and inconsistent across providers and are unsure whether it can be aggregated, electronically downloaded or transmitted.

7/25/2017

A study in Diabetes Care showed that 78% of women with newly diagnosed gestational diabetes were compliant for preprandial self-monitoring blood glucose tests and 65.9% were compliant for postprandial SMBG tests. French researchers used a cohort of 91 women and found that preeclampsia occurred in 1.9% of those who had good compliance, compared with 12.1% of those with poor compliance.

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Diabetes Care, blood glucose
7/25/2017

Japanese researchers found no significant differences in terms of cardiovascular events between high-risk hypertensive patients who received the angiotensin blocker candesartan and those who received the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine, but those on candesartan had a lower rate of new-onset diabetes at 4.7%, compared with 6.4% in the amlodipine group. The findings were presented at the 21st Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress and based on the Candesartan Antihypertensive Survival Evaluation in Japan 10 trial involving 1,342 individuals.

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candesartan, amlodipine
7/25/2017

A breakthrough technique combining whole-body FDG-PET/CT and a 72-hour high-fat, low-sugar diet prior to imaging developed by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers found that 40% of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis also had sarcoidosis in other body organs. The approach, described in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, may bolster sarcoidosis staging and treatment, but more studies are needed, said researcher Dr. Nadera Sweiss.

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DOTMed, EurekAlert!
7/25/2017

A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in Pediatrics found that many people confuse food allergies with other adverse reactions to food, while 38% of primary care physicians incorrectly said that blood tests or skin-prick tests are adequate to provide food allergy diagnosis. The report also encouraged improvements in food allergy diagnosis and prevention education.

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HealthDay News
7/25/2017

Studies suggest that when schools remove flavored milk from the menu students adapt and drink plain milk, which is lower in sugar and calories, said registered dietitian Megan Robinson. Parents should encourage children to choose milk, even if it is flavored, at school because it is healthier than eating junk food such as cookies and desserts, Robinson said.

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Philly (Philadelphia)
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Megan Robinson, milk, junk food
7/25/2017

Humectants and anticaking agents, FDA-approved food additives that can be made from natural sources or manufactured, help preserve the quality of processed foods that may sit on the grocery store shelf for a time, writes registered dietitian nutritionist Kathleen Zelman. While these additives have been extensively tested and deemed safe, Zelman says people may be sensitive to humectants if exposed to large amounts and experience symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea.