News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/25/2018

Researchers followed 1,078 patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease for three years and found that those with a mean walking speed of 5.1 kilometers per hour had a lower risk of hospitalization than those who walked at a slower pace. The findings, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, showed the hospitalization risk was reduced 19% for every 1 kilometer per hour increase in speed.

4/25/2018

Wildlife biologists are asking hunters in Washington state to report sightings of lame or limping elk with deformed, overgrown or broken hooves -- signs of treponeme-associated hoof disease, a bacterial infection that causes digital dermatitis in cattle, sheep and goats. The disease has been found in elk in 11 Washington counties, and Gov. Jay Inslee recently authorized $1.5 million in funding to Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine to study the disease.

4/25/2018

Some military surgeons might lack the experience needed to perform complex procedures or respond to battlefield trauma, and acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery has asked the Defense Health Board to review the military's complex procedure policies. Dr. Paul Cordts of the Defense Health Agency said the military could address the issue by participating in surgical registries, establishing centers of excellence for particular procedures, partnering with civilian and VA hospitals and inviting civilian surgical experts to operate alongside military surgical personnel at base hospitals.

4/25/2018

Repeated deployments separated by six months or less, as well as deployment within the first year of service, raise the risk of suicide, according to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry. "Our findings indicate that suicide attempts among soldiers during or after their second deployment might be reduced by as much as 14.2 percent if all soldiers were in the U.S. Army for more than one year before first deployment," researchers wrote.

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NBC News
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JAMA Psychiatry, U.S. Army
4/25/2018

Danish researchers evaluated 371 patients who participated in the South Danish Diabetes Study and found that treatment with insulin, metformin and rosiglitazone was not associated with bone metabolism impairment among type 2 diabetes patients. The findings in the journal Bone showed that metformin did not contribute to an increase in bone formation, while short- or long-acting insulin did not affect levels of bone turnover markers, and no association was found between rosiglitazone and increased bone resorption.

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Bone, rosiglitazone, metformin
4/25/2018

Twenty-one percent of adolescent girls with type 2 diabetes showed signs of menstrual dysfunction indicating possible polycystic ovarian syndrome, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers analyzed 190 girls and found that irregular periods also correlated with higher testosterone levels and said it could lead to an increased risk for endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer.

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MD Magazine online
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endometrial cancer, testosterone
4/25/2018

A study in Pediatrics showed a nearly 2.6% post-arterial ischemic stroke in-hospital mortality rate among neonates and children, while 64.6% of cases with reported causes of death were due to strokes. Researchers also found that congenital heart disease and posterior plus anterior circulation stroke were the strongest in-hospital mortality risk factors for pediatric AIS, while stroke presentation without seizure was associated with mortality only among neonates and Hispanic ethnicity was associated with mortality only among children.

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2 Minute Medicine
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ischemic stroke
4/25/2018

Canadian researchers found that 74% of children with autism spectrum disorder who underwent cognitive behavioral therapy sessions had improved emotional regulation, compared with 31% of those in the waitlist group. The findings in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry were based on 2013 to 2016 trial data involving 68 youths ages 8 to 12 and their parents.

4/25/2018

Systemic lupus erythematosus ranked 10th among the leading causes of death among women ages 15 to 24 from 2000 to 2015, and it was the most common chronic inflammatory disease for the age range, researchers reported in Arthritis & Rheumatology. SLE is among the 20 leading causes of mortality in women and girls ages 5 to 64 in the US.

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Family Practice News
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SLE, lupus erythematosus, Arthritis
4/25/2018

A study in the American Journal of Public Health found almost a quarter of adults in the US had arthritis from 1999 to 2014, with the more than twofold increase in osteoarthritis prevalence significant among men and women, those with high socioeconomic status, and those with multiple races. The findings, based on 43,706 adult participants of National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, also showed a decline in rheumatoid arthritis prevalence that was most pronounced among men, those with obesity or low-income, and non-Hispanic blacks.

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Arthritis, National Health, Obesity