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8/15/2018

Veterinarian Jennifer McQuiston, an expert on Capnocytophaga with the CDC, says she has two dogs that lick her children, and most Capnocytophaga infections respond well to common antibiotics. People with alcoholism, the elderly, people with weak immune systems and people who do not have a spleen are at risk of sepsis from Capnocytophaga infections, and recognizing the symptoms is key to recovery, Dr. McQuiston and other experts say.

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USA Today
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CDC
8/15/2018

Medical screenings for gambling disorder will be required for people serving in the military under legislation signed by President Donald Trump this week. Keith Whyte of the National Council on Problem Gambling said active-duty troops have been found to have gambling issues at two to three times the rate of civilians.

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SBC Americas (UK)
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Donald Trump, National Council
8/15/2018

Elephants have 20 copies of the p53 gene, which encodes a protein that appears to activate LIF6, a previously dormant gene unique to elephants whose protein attacks mitochondria in cells with damaged DNA. The process causes apoptosis and may help explain elephants' resistance to cancer. The findings, published in Cell Reports, might give scientists a better understanding of how cancer develops and clues for treating cancer in people, study co-author Vincent Lynch says.

8/15/2018

Florida-based Adventist Health System will rebrand its 47 hospitals as AdventHealth to make them more identifiable. CEO Terry Shaw says his experiences trying to arrange post-discharge care for his wife after a truck crash made him realize Adventist needed to change its policies, leading to the adoption of a care navigator program.

8/15/2018

A study in Clinical Endocrinology showed that individuals with nonfunctioning adrenal incidentaloma had a significantly higher frequency of metabolic syndrome and higher rates of prediabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased waist circumference, compared with the control group.

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Endocrinology Advisor
8/15/2018

Australian researchers analyzed the stool samples of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and those at higher or lower diabetes risk and found that "changes in gut bacteria weren't just a side effect of the disease, but are likely related to disease progression." The findings, published in Diabetes Care, identified proteins that may be used for new treatments to stop the progression of diabetes.

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Diabetes (UK)
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Diabetes Care
8/15/2018

UK researchers studied 12 healthy males and found that eating breakfast before exercise led to an increased rate at which the body metabolizes carbohydrates and digests and absorbs food eaten after exercise, compared with skipping breakfast. The findings in The American Journal of Physiology -- Endocrinology and Metabolism showed that a pre-exercise breakfast "increases carbohydrate burning during exercise, and that this carbohydrate wasn't just coming from the breakfast that was just eaten, but also from carbohydrate stored in our muscles as glycogen," said researcher Rob Edinburgh.

8/15/2018

A recent survey conducted by the Moll Law Group among 2,000 patients and family caregivers found that patients underestimate whether and when they might need long-term care as well as the costs, making them vulnerable to high out-of-pocket expenses at long-term care facilities. Data from the survey revealed the average respondent's projection for long-term care costs was about $25,350, compared to actual average expenses averaging $47,000 or more depending on the chosen facility.

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Moll Law Group
8/15/2018

Experienced nurses understand what it means to instinctively know that there is something off with their patient based on "gut feelings" that "are agglomerations of observations and experiences that over time have turned into finely tuned clinical judgment," writes hospice nurse Theresa Brown. "There's now solid evidence that when a nurse says she's got a bad feeling about a patient, the entire care team needs to listen," Brown writes.

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Theresa Brown
8/15/2018

The FDA's approval of Novartis' Kymriah, or tisagenlecleucel, to treat pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia brings into focus the need for an educated interdisciplinary team that can recognize most common chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy-related toxicities, according to Kris Mahadeo, section chief and medical director of pediatric stem cell transplantation and cellular therapy at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Pediatric-focused guidelines recognize that toxicities among children may be difficult to recognize.