HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/21/2019

Employers are embracing enthusiasm related to March Madness with activities such as food and livestreaming of games in the office. Staffing firm LaSalle Network holds a yearly party for clients and workers that includes a hot dog cart, beer and games streamed on multiple televisions.

3/21/2019

About 80% of workers feel stressed by ineffective communication in the office, according to a study by Dynamic Signal, often because the communication mode is outdated. Replace fliers in the hall and town-hall meetings with video updates that can be viewed anytime and utilize instant messaging that speaks to the younger workers.

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USA Today
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Dynamic Signal
3/21/2019

A new workout for the body and mind, Pound classes pair aerobic movement with music and drumming using sticks. "Drumming to a certain beat, especially in synchrony with other people, connects a lot of areas of the brain," said Dr. David Burke, professor at the Emory University School of Medicine.

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CNN
3/21/2019

Faculty at Purdue University in Indiana have complained that the wireless internet in academic buildings was becoming incredibly slow, to the point of utter uselessness. In response, the university has banned streaming sites such as Netflix, Hulu and HBO that take up large amounts of internet bandwidth, as well as distracting many students in class.

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Purdue University, Hulu, Netflix
3/21/2019

Job candidates are increasingly being asked to showcase their skills by doing unreasonable amounts of free work for prospective employers. "Seeing how candidates actually approach the work can give employers much stronger data to use in making hiring decisions," Alison Green writes, but candidates asked to do unreasonably large tasks should try to negotiate alternatives -- and be prepared to take a pass on the job.

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Slate
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Alison Green
3/21/2019

As baby boomers move into retirement and a record number of people are quitting their job, the Trump administration is looking to boost the labor force. A Council of Economic Advisers report suggests improving childcare benefits; getting formerly incarcerated people back into the workforce; and allowing more fluid licensing for professionals who move to another state.

3/21/2019

Being proactive in the diversity and inclusion realm can lead to new opportunities as experts in the field are being sought -- and not only in human resources, writes consultant Simone Morris. To tap into this growing niche, expand your networking circle, volunteer for initiatives at your company, and seek out training and reading materials on the subject, she writes.

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Glassdoor
3/21/2019

Today's chief HR officers know how to spot talent, help people solve problems, develop business strategies and adapt to change, writes Christine Hayward, executive director of IIC Partners. "CHROs wear many hats, and they should take advantage of tech tools that help streamline or automate repetitive administrative duties, freeing up time for more strategic or analytical tasks," she writes.

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Forbes
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IIC Partners, CHROs
3/21/2019

BP executives meet regularly with younger employees for insights on technology and dealing with change. Bernard Looney, BP's upstream CEO, regularly meets with 26-year-old petrophysicist Connor Tann, with both employees benefiting from the different perspective.

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BP, Bernard Looney
3/21/2019

HR shared services are valuable in mergers and acquisitions because they integrate knowledge and technology, provide HR services at a lower cost and help develop an effective cultural strategy, write Tom Joseph and Kyle Forrest from Deloitte Consulting. Effective HR shared services teams must be clear about roles and responsibilities, as well as be adept at project management.

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Deloitte Insights
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Deloitte Consulting