HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/17/2019

Navigating the ups and downs of the job search is easier if we're prepared for the vulnerability associated with proving ourselves and the likelihood people will let us down, writes career expert Kourtney Whitehead. "[Let] it be a reminder to you about how you want to treat people in the future when the shoe is on the other foot," she writes.

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Forbes
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Kourtney Whitehead
9/17/2019

People need to consistently state their professional goals online, on a resume and during an interview or risk decision-makers misunderstanding the purpose of their career experience, writes Tim Denning. If that happens, he offers ideas for how to steer a conversation back to your intended career trajectory.

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Tim Denning
9/17/2019

Use positive examples from your work history when asked what management style you prefer, stating what you like versus what you don't, writes Kate Johanns. Familiarize yourself with definitions of these styles and which ones are most likely to apply to potential employers.

9/17/2019

A study has found shy people who intentionally adopt traits of outgoing people during social interactions are happier, writes Meghan Holohan. During the trial, they acted more conversational, spontaneous and assertive.

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Today
9/17/2019

HR should embrace millennials' unique perspectives in the workplace, says Rachel Poon, HR business partner for Swatch Group. "My approach is tracing back to who these employees or millennials are: human," she says.

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Swatch Group
9/17/2019

HR should start planning for Brexit's next phase and be in close contact with potentially affected employees, writes Julie Provino, founder of VeryHR. "Organisations must review their recruitment and benefits strategies if they want to remain compelling and keep current and future employees loyal and on-side," she writes.

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Workforce online
9/17/2019

Talk directly with high-potential employees to learn what they need out of development program rather than relying on anonymous feedback and surveys, writes RJ Heckman, Korn Ferry vice chairman. "In addition to mining survey data, it's important for HR managers to have in-person discussions with high-potential employees," Heckman writes.

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Korn Ferry
9/17/2019

One way to attract and keep Gen Z employees is to give them time off for volunteering, writes Sue Urses from Ivanti. "As these younger workers start families, being able to accommodate family life, work commitment and volunteering will require employers to also be more flexible in their benefits programs," writes Urses.

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TLNT
9/17/2019

While the gap between the technology skills employers need and the tech skills employees have continues to grow, some changes around reskilling and training programs are beginning to make a visible difference, experts say. Companies are putting more resources into boot camps and virtual-reality training programs, and they are needed in the current "extreme" hiring environment, says Barry Asin, president of Staffing Industry Analysts.

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Workforce online
9/17/2019

Intrapreneurs, or those focusing on innovation within a corporation, often create at the edges, with very little in the way of resources and time -- sometimes to spectacular success, Simone Ahuja writes. In this commentary, Ahuja offers suggestions for shifting to a culture of frugal, creative intrapreneurship.

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Training magazine
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Simone Ahuja, intrapreneurs