Industry News
HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/15/2021

The pandemic has nearly everyone reevaluating what they want from their career, with growth a priority even if a straightforward promotion isn't available, writes Julie Winkle Giulioni. She offers four questions that can help leaders understand what employees want, such as "What feelings would you like to experience more during your daily work?"

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SmartBrief/Leadership
10/15/2021

Writing cover letters can be an onerous part of the job search and one that seems unnecessary. But there is a school of thought that cover letters are essential, because they let applicants explain their motivation, address gaps in a resume and show they care.

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BBC
10/15/2021

An estimated 4.3 million people have exited the workforce since the start of the coronavirus crisis and, amid speculation that many may never return, employers are faced with the challenge of having a smaller labor pool to select from and little alternative but to offer higher wages. The mass exit has occurred across most demographic and professional classes, but has been particularly seen in the departure of women and those in lower-paid service sectors.

10/14/2021

David Allen's Getting Things Done productivity approach includes a rule about doing tasks immediately if they will take two minutes or less. This approach makes sense, but it's not always that simple, and so Naphtali Hoff offers some guidance for applying the "two-minute rule" to your daily schedule.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
10/14/2021

Good bosses reject stock leadership strategies in favor of patience, accessibility, praise, bravery, listening and mentorship, writes Megan Hustad. "Much of it requires considerable maturity, wisdom, a practice of self-emptying plus deriving pure enjoyment from the wonder of other people," she writes.

10/14/2021

Employers can gradually reshape the office as a "neighborhood" that includes dedicated areas for departments and space for collaboration and socialization, says Ryan Anderson, vice president of research and global insights for Herman Miller. "Historically, HR departments did not show much of an interest in the physical workplace, but now they have gotten much more involved," Anderson says.

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Bloomberg
More Summaries:
Ryan Anderson
10/13/2021

Because so many women say they don't feel heard in the workplace, it's important that companies listen if they hope to retain talented women and develop them as future leaders, writes Beth Castle, the managing editor of InHerSight. Castle recommends starting Slack channels dedicated to groups such as working parents or singles living alone during the pandemic, holding town hall talks that go beyond business news, encouraging managers to talk to employees about their lives, and setting reachable goals that focus as much on the employee as they do on the work.

10/13/2021

Teams can be better about completing tasks by understanding what's routine and what's urgent, with each group of to-dos receiving deadlines that "schedule the finish," writes David Dye. Leaders, meanwhile, must be aware that employees will tune out someone who is shouting about the urgency of every single activity.

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Let's Grow Leaders
10/13/2021

Long-term, chronic stress is harmful, but some psychologists say there can be benefits associated with short-term stress if people are taught to harness it, Everyday Health reported. A study in the Journal of Experimental Psychology found that students who were taught to view stress as a coping tool performed better on a math exam, reported less anxiety and had lower levels of stress hormones than those who did not learn to view stress constructively. Researcher Jeremy Jamieson, Ph.D., and his team are developing strategies to help people change their perception of stress to deal with everyday challenges -- a practice known as "cognitive reframing."

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Everyday Health
10/13/2021

HR technology spending is projected to set records this year, but organizations will be disappointed with the results if they don't invest in the right areas or focus on post-implementation effects on stakeholders, say HR leaders and consultants. "Ensure that the vendor clearly defines both your roles and theirs in the statement of work, and identify named resources for the implementation so you can hold people accountable," says Teri Zipper, chief operating officer at Sapient Insights Group.