Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/2/2020

Why it matters: No matter how crazy things get, make sure you find a way to continue the rituals that have made you who you are. Whether it's exercising, reading a book, rocking out to your favorite music or just taking a few minutes each day to "find your Zen," do whatever it takes to stay you. You'll always be a better you if you do.

4/2/2020

WYWW reader Julie Knight's son, Doug, played college baseball, but her shining moment comes from the first time Doug took the mound in a player-pitch game. Based on her story, it sounds like Doug had command and confidence from an early age. I might be biased, but I think he has a cool name, too.

Thanks for sharing, Julie. Drop me a line if you have a story to tell.

-- Doug Harris

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Julie Knight
4/2/2020

Many Americans will be getting payments from the government to help cover costs associated with coronavirus business impacts, and scammers are ready to pounce. The IRS advises Americans to protect their personal information, avoid clicking on links in suspicious emails, not download software advertised in pop-up ads and use strong passwords, among other measures that will help guard against identity theft.

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El Paso Times (Texas)
4/2/2020

Kohl's CEO Michelle Gass is giving up her $1.4 million salary to help offset the impact of store closures caused by the ongoing pandemic. The company has been forced to furlough a significant portion of its staff while stores are closed, but says they will still receive health benefits while they are not working.

4/2/2020

General Motors CEO Mary Barra took the lead on the idea of using idle factories to produce ventilators and other much-needed medical supplies to assist in the coronavirus fight, suggesting the move to the federal administration in mid-March. Automakers across the US have shut down plants amid outbreak fears, and both GM and Ford are now producing ventilators in their factories.

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The Verge, Forbes
4/2/2020

Winston Churchill led Britain through World War II by making tough decisions, projecting a sense of confidence to the country and being personally affectionate even as he was often severe about the work, writes Steve McKee. "He could get very emotional, but after bitterly criticizing you he had a habit of touching you, of putting his hand on your hand -- like that -- as if to say that his real feelings for you were not changed," British wartime official Lord Beaverbrook said of Churchill.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Winston Churchill, Steve McKee
4/2/2020

Organizations that need to do layoffs should do it all at once, as "multiple rounds of layoffs demoralizes your team and erodes any trust and confidence they have in you," writes David Ulevitch. "Demonstrate empathy, be a listener, but stand behind the company's decisions," he writes.

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Andreessen Horowitz
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David Ulevitch
4/2/2020

Use this crisis to understand the work, processes and knowledge that truly matter so that your organization can gather, document and focus on those activities after this crisis lifts. Questions to ask include "What non-essential work have we stopped doing that could potentially stay stopped?"

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Let's Grow Leaders
4/2/2020

Companies that cater to doomsday preppers are doing a brisk business during the coronavirus pandemic, with some selling out of supplies and others taking new orders to build personal bunkers. "Most of my clients believe the big one is still to come; they've always wanted a bunker, but coronavirus was the deciding factor," says Ron Hubbard, founder of Atlas Survival Shelters.

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The Hustle
4/2/2020

Companies need to get ahead of the coronavirus, whether it's touting their specific angle of expertise or being ready to proactively communicate an employee's positive test without compromising privacy, writes BoardroomPR executive Todd Templin. "Messaging should demonstrate compassion for hardships that clients and employees are facing," he writes.

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PR Daily