Industry News
Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/25/2020

Companies such as Vistaprint and Gap have been making masks during the pandemic to offset losses elsewhere or to use idle materials, but that business won't last forever. Besides that, it's unclear how profitable masks are for many companies, although some brands see them as "the new customer acquisition tool, essentially a lower-priced entry-level item to attract people to the brand," writes Adam Bluestein.

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Adam Bluestein, Vistaprint
9/25/2020

The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent decades balancing work and family. "Each part of my life provided respite from the other and gave me a sense of proportion that classmates trained only on law studies lacked," she wrote in 2016.

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Insider
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Supreme Court
9/25/2020

Why it matters: The ability to forecast hurricanes has saved countless lives during the last century or so. Some droughts develop over the ocean before heading ashore and scientists have devised a way to forecast when and where that landfall will occur. Droughts wreak all kinds of havoc, from devastating crops to helping turn natural areas into wildfire tinder boxes, so knowing when and where a drought will hit could help preparedness efforts and guide distribution plans for water supplies.

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Stanford University
9/25/2020

Why it matters: My puppy Tater Tot isn't talented enough to offer any home tours, but that doesn't mean he can't model the Halloween costume my kids couldn't resist buying for him. He looks less than thrilled ... almost like he is worried someone is gonna eat him!

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Flickr
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Tater Tot
9/25/2020

This photo was submitted by Gail Hayes. I always thought the Field of Dreams was in Iowa? ;)

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Flickr
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Riley
9/25/2020

Many leaders are adopting a war-like mentality during the pandemic, but they'll eventually need to mix in resilience and servant leadership styles if they want to succeed in the long term, writes Art Petty. "The leaders who bring the emotional intelligence and mental acuity to adjust and adapt their style on the fly, based on the needs of the people and organization, are people we desperately need," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
9/25/2020

Leaders should challenge themselves to reach regular and stretch goals, but they shouldn't forget about "the challenges we often tend to categorize under wishful thinking or being where the dreamers live," writes Tanveer Naseer. While this area of exploration is risky and unknown, it's also where the greatest possibilities lie.

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Tanveer Naseer
9/25/2020

Corporate offsites are happening over the internet this year, and that requires a different approach, starting with shorter days. "It's difficult to recreate the feel of an in-person brainstorming session, and if you don't take extra steps to try, poor engagement will mean that ultimately, idea quality will suffer," writes Wrike CEO Andrew Filev.

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Wrike
9/25/2020

Companies struggle with communicating risk because they don't plan ahead and don't trust people to handle nuance, write Ann Cleaveland, Jessica Cussins Newman and Steven Weber of the UC Berkeley Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity. "If risk communications were pushed down through organizations into product development, we'd see innovation in user experience and user interface design for communicating about uncertainty with customers," they write.

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UC Berkeley Center, Steven Weber
9/25/2020

Award-winning Singaporean artist and WERK Magazine founder Theseus Chan says making the most of the moment can help with creativity and problem-solving. "If you make an effort to compartmentalize your expectations, and if you can remove those that are irrelevant, you'll be much freer and your general well-being will improve," he says.