Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/20/2019

The US House of Representatives passed HR 1, a voting reform package, that has sections specifically designed to help college students in the process of voting. The bill is aimed at addressing issues commonly affecting students with changes such as allowing same-day registration and changing state voting ID laws.

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Inside Higher Ed
3/20/2019

For-profit college Argosy University has closed after the US Education Department determined that the school did not qualify for its federal financial-aid program because of its failure to settle payments with students for living costs. This means hundreds of students have to find and gain admission into new schools to earn their degrees, on top of being left to personally deal with their debt to the now-defunct college.

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ConsumerAffairs
3/20/2019

Cecil Staton is stepping down in May as chancellor of East Carolina University, and tensions have risen within the Board of Governors for the University of North Carolina system. Board member Steven Long defended Staton and even publicly criticized the system's board chairman, Harry Smith, in a statement, saying Smith was responsible for a "long-running campaign of false accusations and irrational attacks" on Staton.

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Inside Higher Ed
3/20/2019

CVS Health is partnering with the American Cancer Society and Truth Initiative to donate funds to colleges and universities that have tobacco-free campuses. The grant money, totaling more than $1.4 million, will be given to 82 schools to help enforce and promote anti-tobacco policies.

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Drug Store News
3/20/2019

Colorado State University has announced that Joyce McConnell will take over for President Tony Frank on July 1. McConnell, whose appointment is subject to approval from the school's governing board, is the provost and vice president for academic affairs at West Virginia University, and she will be the first female president at Colorado State.

3/20/2019

The FBI investigation that resulted in 50 individuals being charged with crimes related to college admissions fraud found that the University of Southern California was the most common target for the alleged scheme. Six people charged are either current or former employees of the private university.

3/19/2019

In a list of recommended changes to the Higher Education Act, the White House submitted a proposal that would cap the amount of federal student loans that can be taken out in a larger plan to cut the cost of higher education. White House adviser Ivanka Trump introduced the proposal at a National Council for the American Worker meeting, but she did not elaborate on what the specific limits would be.

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The Associated Press
3/19/2019

US colleges, universities and schools are using virtual-reality experiences to recruit students from other countries. Kevin Merges, executive director of Global Education Programs at Rutgers Preparatory School in Somerset, N.J., says VR can improve students' connection to a school by 40% to 70%.

3/19/2019

The best way to improve one's leadership abilities is to learn from mistakes made, such as hiring the wrong person or failing to seek out other perspectives, writes Scott Cowen, president emeritus of Tulane University. "If everyone likes you, chances are that you have not made any tough decisions," Cowen says.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Scott Cowen, Tulane University
3/19/2019

The FBI investigation, "Operation Varsity Blues," involving alleged fraud in college admissions -- including possible cheating on standardized tests -- is reviving questions about whether SAT and ACT tests should be required for college applicants. The College Board is defending the objectivity of their exams, but many critics say the tests are inherently discriminatory and susceptible to cheating techniques.

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College Board, FBI