Chemicals
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5/17/2019

The American Chemistry Council says a proposal being considered by the California Legislature that would require manufacturers and retailers to slash single-use packaging and products needs refining to address details and hard-to-replace uses of plastic, such as in medical equipment. "We're hoping to sit down between now and the end of the year to try to work something out that makes sense for recycling, for composting, for the environment, for manufacturers," said ACC's Tim Shestek.

5/17/2019

Although the Environmental Protection Agency has postponed the effective date for "inactive" chemical designations on the updated Toxic Substances Control Act inventory, the EPA confirms it has been accepting substance activity notifications since February and will consider them valid. The new effective date moved forward an approximately three-month-long "transition period" in which companies can submit Notification of Activity forms for chemicals whose use was resumed outside the TSCA reporting period, thus excluding them from the updated inventory.

5/17/2019

Bayer is confident that it can overturn a string of jury verdicts that found its glyphosate weedkiller Roundup caused cancer, noting that appeals will be heard by judges. The company will argue that the lawsuits should be invalidated because the Environmental Protection Agency found the herbicide is not a public health risk, thus barring claims under state law.

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5/17/2019

ExxonMobil has contracted Tecnimont SPA and Performance Contractors to design a $2 billion expansion of its chemical plant in Baytown, Texas. The project will include a Vistamaxx performance polymer unit and a linear alpha olefins unit.

5/17/2019

Japan's Economy Ministry reports that the country's ethylene production increased 6.7% in April, compared with April 2018. Although production dropped between March and April, April's output represented an 18.7 percentage-point increase from the prior year.

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Reuters
5/17/2019

Dutch chemical company Royal DSM is developing 3D-printing materials for use in the Open Additive Production platform being created by Origin, a San Francisco company. The companies said they are optimizing DSM's photopolymer material for "programmable photopolymerization" technology that turns materials into isotropic parts and completed products.

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5/16/2019

A new report criticizing the plastics industry for greenhouse gas emissions overlooks the long-term environmental benefits of the material, including how lightweight materials make shipping more efficient and have a smaller footprint than many alternatives, says Steve Russell of the American Chemistry Council. "Plastics are often used in products that help to reduce much larger amounts of greenhouse gas emissions over their life cycle," he says.

5/16/2019

Lawmakers on Wednesday debated the merits of a class-based approach to PFAS regulation during a hearing of the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change. The EPA should take its time reviewing the issue and hold off on a rushed, class-based approach, said Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill.

5/16/2019

Organohalogen flame retardants include a variety of substances with different characteristics, which makes a class-based approach inappropriate, says the American Chemistry Council's North American Flame Retardant Alliance, echoing the views of a National Academies committee. The panel's finding "confirms what scientists, regulators, and other authoritative bodies have already determined: It is not scientifically accurate or appropriate to make broad conclusions or impose a one-size-fits-all regulatory approach," says NAFRA.

5/16/2019

A bill awaiting Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's signature would change how the state designates chemical recycling facilities and provide companies with the certainty needed to build out Texas' portion of what could become a $9.9 billion domestic industry, says Craig Cookson of the American Chemistry Council. Texas could support 40 chemical recycling sites and add $501 million to the state's economy annually by chemically recycling a quarter of its total plastic waste, ACC says.