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8/20/2019

Only about 0.7% of patients who logged on to their health care system's patient portal in March 2018 did so using a third-party app, but the percentage rose by 0.14% monthly through December 2018, according to a research letter published in JAMA Network Open. Although the study involved a single EHR vendor and only 12 large health systems, the results provide a baseline for tracking patient use of smartphones to manage EHR data, researchers wrote.

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EHR Intelligence
8/20/2019

Eagles' Haven, staffed by social workers and mental health counselors, opened to help those affected by the shooting last year at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. The center aims to provide relief and a sense of community for students, parents and teachers, offering wellness classes and the opportunity to speak with a counselor.

8/20/2019

Data on more than 32 million patients have been compromised this year alone, and the problem is expected to get worse as more health care institutions migrate their data to the cloud. The cost of breaches rose 7% from 2017 to 2018, putting a financial strain on the industry, and "the government may need to step in to help deliver a better cybersecurity framework amid its push toward the promises of digital health," writes Zachary Hendrickson.

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Business Insider
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Zachary Hendrickson
8/20/2019

Researchers found increased levels of peripheral T helper cells, particularly CXCR5-PD-1hi, in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and significantly higher number of Tph cells among those who tested positive for autoantibodies and later developed type 1 diabetes. The association between Tph cells and the development of type 1 diabetes could be used to develop "better methods to predict type 1 diabetes risk and new immunotherapies for the disease," said Ilse Ekman, lead author of the study published in Diabetologia.

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Diabetes (UK)
8/20/2019

Research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that roughly 22% of the 10.7 million diabetes patients with A1C levels of less than 7% received intensive glucose lowering therapy, which resulted in 4,804 emergency department visits and 4,774 hospital admissions for hypoglycemia over a two-year period. The findings also revealed that those with clinically complex profiles were at a higher risk for hypoglycemia and more likely to "experience other adverse events because of intensive or overtreatment," said lead researcher Dr. Rozalina McCoy.

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Medical News Today
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Mayo Clinic Proceedings
8/20/2019

A systematic review in PLOS Medicine, based on 28 studies involving women with gestational diabetes, showed that neonates born to metformin-treated mothers had lower birth weights and lower macrosomia risk, compared with those born to insulin-treated mothers. UK researchers also found that compared with youths with prenatal insulin exposure, those with prenatal metformin exposure had 0.44 kg greater body weight by ages 18 months to 24 months, as well as 0.8 kg/m2 higher body mass index by ages 5 years to 9 years.

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metformin
8/20/2019

A study published in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, based on data from 4,081 adults, found that increased body mass index at follow-up and increased insulin resistance, measured by triglyceride glucose index, at baseline positively correlated with a higher risk for hypertension. The findings also revealed that the relationship between elevated TyG index at follow-up and elevated BMI at baseline was marginally significant for hypertension risk.

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hypertension
8/20/2019

Prescriptions for 4 grams of omega-3 fatty acids daily, alone or with statin medications or ezetimibe, can help reduce triglycerides following diet and lifestyle changes, according to an American Heart Association advisory published in Circulation. Researchers analyzed data from 17 clinical trials that included patients with high triglyceride levels.

8/20/2019

Fairview Health Services CEO James Hereford writes that neither fee-for-service nor managed care is right for patients, and the US must "forge a new path" with transparency that empowers patients and health care providers. He cites examples such as partnerships between providers and insurers to give patients upfront cost and benefits data, making real costs transparent and part of decision-making, and the adoption of technology that gives providers more time with patients to provide hands-on care.

8/20/2019

The American Hospital Association said the CMS should proactively identify billing codes for complex new technologies, rescind the JW modifier, align billing requirements with Current Procedural Terminology codes, minimize or rescind temporary Healthcare Procedure Coding System level II codes and revise recovery audit contractor incentives that cause improperly denied claims. The Healthcare Business Management Association, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and others said the CMS should reform the prior authorization process, particularly in Medicare Advantage, and America's Health Insurance Plans acknowledged that automating the process would make it less burdensome.

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RevCycle Intelligence