News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/16/2019

Project Play, a Fayetteville, Ark., group, is gathering toys to send to migrant children in a detention center at the US-Mexico border to help encourage playtime. "This is how you can start to speak the language of healing, and that's through play and art," says Felicia Ramos, a social worker who founded Project Play.

7/16/2019

Former Vice President and Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden released a $750 billion health care plan, which he says would shore up the Affordable Care Act and allow Americans to maintain coverage by private health insurance or purchase coverage through a public option like Medicare. Biden's plan also includes proposals to cut prescription drug prices by allowing Medicare to negotiate prices with drugmakers, restricting prices for new drugs with no competition and permitting consumers to purchase drugs from abroad.

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Reuters, The Hill
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Joe Biden, Medicare, ACA
7/16/2019

The FDA issued a complete response letter to AstraZeneca declining its application for Farxiga, or dapagliflozin, to be used as a supplement to insulin in adult patients with type 1 diabetes that do not respond adequately to insulin alone. The company plans to meet with the agency to decide its next action.

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Reuters
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FDA, AstraZeneca, Farxiga
7/16/2019

Researchers reported at the Heart in Diabetes conference that women with type 2 diabetes in the US had worse health outcomes, such as being less likely to receive cardiovascular drugs, having multiple hospitalizations and worse quality of life than men, while patients who received a diabetes diagnosis before age 40 had an up to 50% increased risk for combined renal and CV endpoints and renal death than those diagnosed later. Findings also revealed that blacks and Hispanic Americans had the lowest CVD health scores among women.

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diabetes
7/16/2019

Preschoolers with obesity whose parents alone underwent an obesity treatment program, which included parenting skills training, with or without booster sessions, had greater declines in body mass index z-scores after 12 months, compared with children and parents who received standard treatment, according to a Swedish study in Pediatrics. However, researchers found that only those in the booster session group had weight status improvements.

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Obesity
7/16/2019

Researchers evaluated data from six studies involving 36,030 adult participants and found that those who had elevated LDL cholesterol levels before age 40 had a 64% higher risk of having a heart attack, compared with those with low levels of LDL cholesterol. Findings published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology also showed that young adults with high systolic and diastolic blood pressure had increased odds of developing heart failure later in life.

Full Story:
Reuters
7/16/2019

A big challenge for chief experience officers in health care is staying ahead of patient and family expectations, said Dwight McBee, chief experience officer at Temple University Health System in Philadelphia. "Health care is a rapidly changing environment, and the experience of care is often the differentiator when other services and quality outcomes are comparable," McBee said.

7/16/2019

Kentucky-based XLerateHealth opened an office in Flint, Mich., and selected six health care startups, half run by women, for its first Michigan boot camp. CEO Jackie Willmot said health systems and universities create a good environment for startups.

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WEYI-TV (Clio, Mich.)
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XLerateHealth
7/16/2019

Israel-based GiantLeap and DosentRX graduated from the Texas Medical Center's medical technology accelerator program and are opening offices in Houston, while InnoSphere, also founded in Israel, will be part of the accelerator's next cohort, writes Amir Mizroch of Start-Up Nation Central. Mizroch says the growing Israeli presence at TMC creates a "large-scale launchpad for Israeli digital health innovations into the complex US healthcare system."

Full Story:
Forbes
7/16/2019

A report from the HHS Office of Inspector General found some state Medicaid programs failed to meet 2018 CMS requirements that they conduct criminal background checks on providers at high risk of fraud. A 2016 report found many states struggled to implement background checks, and the OIG said failing to do a fingerprint-based check opens Medicaid to fraud and abuse.

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FierceHealthcare
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HHS, OIG