News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/2/2020

Women continue to be underrepresented in radiology, but their ranks are growing and those who do work in the profession are speaking out, dispelling myths and developing solutions to improve gender diversity. "When women see other women speaking, they see that not everyone in radiology looks the same," says Dr. Geraldine McGinty, chair of the ACR Board of Chancellors.

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Radiology Today
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ACR Board of Chancellors
4/2/2020

Young siblings can develop social skills together through activities that promote teamwork, communication, compassion and patience, writes social worker Heather Gilmore. Completing puzzles, playing a sport or board game and reading together can build life skills, she writes.

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Psych Central
4/2/2020

Winston Churchill led Britain through World War II by making tough decisions, projecting a sense of confidence to the country and being personally affectionate even as he was often severe about the work, writes Steve McKee. "He could get very emotional, but after bitterly criticizing you he had a habit of touching you, of putting his hand on your hand -- like that -- as if to say that his real feelings for you were not changed," British wartime official Lord Beaverbrook said of Churchill.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Winston Churchill, Steve McKee
4/2/2020

A preliminary study to be published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society found that patients with type 2 diabetes who used a wearable patch pump insulin delivery device called V-Go and an older, cheaper insulin achieved a slight improvement in blood glucose control. Lead author Pablo Mora wrote that such insulin delivery devices like V-Go could potentially become a more affordable alternative for patients with type 2 diabetes who need to get the components of both long-acting and mealtime insulins from regular insulins with the same effectiveness and safety.

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HealthDay News
4/2/2020

Patients with type 1 diabetes who were Caucasian or had private health insurance were more likely to use diabetes technologies compared with non-Caucasian patients -- except Asian patients -- or those with government health insurance, according to a study presented at the Endocrine Society Annual Scientific Sessions. Based on data from 227 diabetes patients ages 18 and older, the findings also revealed that among those who used continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, 43% were Caucasian, while only 14.2% were Hispanic and 14% were African American.

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HCPLive Network
4/2/2020

With supplies of N95 respirator masks dwindling, University of Florida anesthesiologist Bruce Spiess and colleagues found a new use for polypropylene fabric that would otherwise be thrown away after being used to protect sterile surgical instruments from contamination. Spiess and his team created prototypes and ran tests with saffron spray to confirm few particles made it through the mask.

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University of Florida
4/2/2020

Flagship Pioneering has a $1.1 billion venture capital fund to develop some 25 biotech companies over the next three years that are equipped to succeed in a future shaped by the pandemic. CEO Noubar Afeyan expects greater focus on health security, artificial intelligence and new ideas for existing platforms.

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FierceBiotech
4/2/2020

The FDA is asking manufacturers of over-the-counter and prescription ranitidine drugs, sold under the Zantac brand, to immediately remove their products from the market because of concerns over levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine, a probable carcinogen. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said the many samples tested did not contain unacceptable levels of NDMA, but an agency investigation found that NMDA levels increase over time and when the drugs are exposed to higher-than-normal temperatures.

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The Hill, CNN
4/2/2020

Ryvu Therapeutics said the FDA has given orphan drug designation to its acute myeloid leukemia candidate SEL120, an investigational oral CDK8 kinase inhibitor. The treatment is being evaluated in a Phase Ib study for safety and efficacy in patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome or relapsed or refractory AML.

4/2/2020

Children who had started eating solid foods at or before three months had a significantly higher bacteria diversity in their stool samples at three months and at 12 months, an indication of a more diverse gut bacterial population, compared with those who had started on solid foods at a later time, according to a study published in BMC Microbiology. The findings, based on data involving 67 children, also showed that infants who had started on solid foods by three months had significantly higher concentrations of butyric acid and total short-chain fatty acids at 12 months, which have been linked to an increased risk for obesity and diabetes.

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Futurity