News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/13/2019

In a commentary published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, Dr. Bibb Allen, chief medical officer of the ACR Data Science Institute, and colleagues discuss how the use of artificial intelligence can bolster radiology and how "the combination of humans plus AI has great potential to improve care." AI developers should focus on tasks that radiologists can't do well, as well as ways to improve department efficiency and enhance patient safety, they write.

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AI in Healthcare
12/13/2019

Children and teens who were exposed to secondhand smoke were more likely to have increased abdominal aorta stiffness, which is associated with elevated atherosclerosis risk, according to a study in Pediatric Research. However, the findings, based on ultrasound data involving 298 non-smoking youths ages 8 to 18, showed that secondhand smoke exposure had no effect to the brachial and carotid arteries.

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HealthDay News
12/13/2019

Letting pets graze all day, allowing them to share bowls and feeding them homemade diets, frequent treats or table scraps are among the most problematic mistakes pet owners make when it comes to feeding pets, veterinarians say. These and other common practices can lead to obesity or malnutrition, and veterinarian Ann Eliopulos also cautions against giving dogs cooked bones, which can splinter and perforate the gastrointestinal tract.

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Insider
12/13/2019

Voters in the UK have long posted photos on social media of their dogs at polling stations, and this week's elections were no different, though a few of the pets were unusual. A voter in southwestern England brought two reindeer pulling a sleigh, some brought cats, others brought horses, and one voter brought a tortoise.

12/13/2019

We may be less willing to compromise with others if we believe they'll oppose our ideas, but research suggests we often overestimate the level of opposition. "But if those contexts are reframed as cooperative, accurately forecasting how someone across the negotiation table might respond to a particular proposal becomes easier," says Harvard Business School doctoral candidate Jeffrey Lees.

12/13/2019

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 300,000 British individuals ages 40 to 69 and found that a 1 kg/m2 reduction in body mass index among people who were not overweight and had no family history of diabetes was linked with up to 37% lower risk of type 2 diabetes, while individuals with obesity and a family history of diabetes were able to reduce risk by 21% with BMI reductions. The findings, published in PLOS Medicine, suggest that "all individuals can substantially reduce their type 2 diabetes risk through weight loss."

12/13/2019

A study in The American Journal of Gastroenterology found that endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty was safe for children and adolescents with obesity, and it was associated with significant and lasting weight loss. Mean BMI decreased from 2 kg/m2 to 1.3 kg/m2 in the nine months following the procedure, and patients lost 80% of excess weight during the year after the procedure.

12/13/2019

Organizations developing physician leaders should develop a recruitment program and create a career path, write Michael Abrams and Gordon Phillips of Numerof & Associates. Leadership programs should be evaluated often for their effectiveness, and potential leaders should be assessed for their competency.

12/13/2019

Cigna's Express Scripts has chosen 15 programs from technology companies for a new digital health formulary. The formulary, which will include treatments for depression, anxiety, asthma and diabetes, will launch in January, and CVS Caremark is planning to offer a similar program.

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CNBC, FierceHealthcare
12/13/2019

Health care providers' lack of permission to show emotion and vulnerability can lead to a culture of zero tolerance for mistakes and can have negative health effects, write Roel van der Heijde of the Patient-Centered Care Association in The Netherlands and Dirk Deichmann of Erasmus University. Efforts to improve health care should focus less on why things go wrong and more on why things go right most of the time.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Dirk Deichmann