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7/13/2020

Hypoglycemic episodes were frequent among patients with both type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease and many of the episodes were prolonged and severe, according to a prospective, observational study in Kidney360. The findings also showed that such hypoglycemic events mostly happened from 1 a.m. to 9 a.m., and the factors tied to having higher hypoglycemic risk include older age, lower hemoglobin A1C and insulin treatment.

7/13/2020

Women taking antidepressants were found to have a 34% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a median follow-up of 6.4 years, compared with those who didn't take antidepressants, according to a study published in Diabetic Medicine. Based on data from 63,999 women, the findings also cited selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, imipramine-type antidepressants, and 'other' or 'mixed' antidepressants as among the antidepressants particularly associated with an increased diabetes risk.

7/13/2020

Utah has already spent over $3.7 million on a location-tracking app to help public health agencies track exposure to the novel coronavirus, but the app, Healthy Together, hasn't been very helpful, says state epidemiologist Angela Dunn. Approximately 200 users have granted permission for location tracking, and state leaders say they will disable the GPS function.

7/13/2020

Immigrants to the US face hurdles to health care such as language barriers, a lack of translators, low health literacy and cultural differences, but "the underlying structure of medicine fails to account for the diverse backgrounds of the patients we treat on an everyday basis," writes Harvard Medical School student Caroline Lee. Data on race and ethnicity are routinely collected, but data on country of origin and migration aren't, leaving a critical gap in health care providers' ability to assess risk, Lee writes.

7/13/2020

AstraZeneca made its debut at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference, launching the Shanghai AI Open Lab. The company is seeking partnerships and identified 10 areas where AI could play a role in health care, including tumor imaging, digestive disease diagnosis and chronic disease management.

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7/13/2020

The World Health Organization reported more than 230,000 new coronavirus cases in a 24-hour period this weekend, a new high. Dr. Michael Ryan, head of the WHO emergencies program, says the global community will be unable to eradicate the virus under current conditions and advises world leaders to look to the battle against HIV/AIDS for guidance on containing the pandemic.

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7/13/2020

Dr. Tunde Sotunde is the new CEO at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina and says he brings the perspectives of a physician, patient and health plan leader to the job of making health care better, simpler and more affordable. Sotunde says his short-term goal is to navigate the pandemic and his longer term goal is to accelerate the insurer's innovation agenda.

7/13/2020

A study that included 31 COVID-19-positive pregnant women who gave birth at one of three Italian hospitals found that two gave birth to infected infants, demonstrating the possibility of vertical transmission of COVID-19, though the researchers say more study is needed. The findings, presented at the International AIDS Conference, showed that placenta specimens were positive for the virus in both cases.

7/13/2020

People with ulcerative colitis who followed a high-fiber, low-fat diet saw less inflammation and had improvement in the bacterial imbalance of the gastrointestinal tract, compared with those whose diet was high in fiber but also higher in fat, researchers reported in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The diet also is being tested in people who have Crohn's disease.

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7/13/2020

A survey of more than 3,800 people in New York City found almost twice as many who lived within a five-minute walk of a park sometimes or often used it for exercise, compared with those who were more than 30 minutes away. The study, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, found that compared with
people who rarely exercised in a park or never did, frequent users had one fewer day with mental health issues each month, but only if they were not concerned about park-related crime.

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