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1/15/2021

Microsoft is working on a patch for a Windows 10 vulnerability that can corrupt a hard drive if the user opens a folder with a shortcut that contains a hidden threat; the hard drive is also at risk if the user extracts the ZIP file. The fix may require the corrupted data to be repaired manually.

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The Verge
1/15/2021

Affordable, future-ready PowerLite models enhance student engagement and optimize existing spaces with eye-catching effects and displays. The six new PowerLite laser displays for education and signage are the PowerLite L250F, L255F, L200W, and L200X long-throw, and PowerLite L200SW and L200SX short-throw projectors.

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AV Network
1/15/2021

AVIXA has announced the 2021 leadership of the association's councils and committees, which guide the planning and development of membership policies and education training programs. New chairs for 2021 include Justin Frick of AV Chicago, Vince Shuster of MediaStar Systems, Kevin McLoughlin, and Gregory Rushton of Mulvey & Banani AV.

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AV Network
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Committee Leadership
1/15/2021

Lowell's space-saving solution for tower computers keeps work areas clear by moving the personal computer off the desktop and into its own space without relegating it to the floor. The WMS-CPU-4 shelf mounts to a wall or desk, placing the CPU out of the way, while allowing computer drives and ports to remain readily accessible.

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AV Network
1/15/2021

CES 2021 might well be the year of the rollable phone. Not only has the LG Rollable been teased, which will be available later this year, but TCL has also given us an update on its rollable concept we first saw last March. TCL says that the phone can extend from a 6.7-inch phone into a 7.8-inch tablet at the tap of a finger, though the video seems to show off a chunkier square-shaped device that expands into the more traditional rectangular phone shape.

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Tom's Guide
1/15/2021

Kyocera is known for its line of durable phones. So when the phone maker rolls out a 5G-ready device, it's not about to give up one of the most distinct things about its smartphone lineup. Even better, we learned at CES 2021 that the Kyocera DuraForce Ultra 5G UW will be available in the US, as Verizon plans to offer the phone later this year.

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Tom's Guide
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Verizon, UW
1/15/2021

Of all the methods retailers have devised to fight scalpers, PS5 bundles may be one of the most effective. Recently, my colleague Roland Moore-Colyer wrote an article about elusive PS5s staying in stock longer than ever before, at least partially due to being sold along with games and accessories rather than à la carte. And while his reasoning is almost certainly correct, being able to find PS5 only in bundles is, at best, a mixed blessing.

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Tom's Guide
1/15/2021

It's a great time to be a Star Wars fan. The Mandalorian just wrapped up a successful second season; Ubisoft is hard at work on a huge open-world Star Wars game; and Jedi: Fallen Order just got a next-gen patch that improves the frame rate and resolution on both the PS5 and Xbox Series X. There's only one small catch: the Xbox Series X version of the Jedi: Fallen Order patch works slightly better.

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Tom's Guide
1/15/2021

Is there a new king in Android town? Make way for the Samsung Galaxy S21 series, comprising three new handsets: the standard Galaxy S21, the S21 Plus, and the top-of-the-line S21 Ultra. Their launch headlines this week Noise Cancelling podcast – but they're not the clear-cut upgrade you might expect...

Let's quickly look at them in turn, starting with the S21: it's a 6.2-inch handset with a 1080 x 2400 AMOLED display. That's a drop in resolution from the S20 series, but you're getting a  max refresh rate of 120Hz for a smoother screen experience, and you're also getting the latest Snapdragon 888 or Exynos 2100 chipset (depending on where you are in the world). A three-lens rear camera setup offers 12MP main, 64MP telephoto and 12MP ultra-wide options, plus the ability to shoot 8K video. Note, though, that you also won't get any earbuds or a charger in the box. Some upgrades then, and some downgrades, but the starting price drops accordingly to $799 / £769.

The S21 Plus is a similar handset, but with a 6.7-inch screen and a battery bump from 4,000mAh to 4,800mAh to power that larger screen. It's essentially just a larger version of the Galaxy S21, and it's priced from $999 / £949.

The clear leader of the pack, though, is the flagship Galaxy S21 Ultra. It's the biggest (6.8-inches), sharpest (1440 x 3200 with 120Hz refresh rate), has the largest battery (5000mAh) and, unsurprisingly, is the most expensive, starting at $1,199 / £1,149. It's got not one, but two telephoto lenses, as well as 108MP main and 12MP ultra-wide cameras, and a 40MP selfie camera. Every camera on the phone can shoot 4K footage at 60fps, too.

It's a really interesting mix then – and while small cutbacks have been made in a few areas, you're looking at a decent saving across the range compared to last year's phones.

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techradar.com
1/15/2021

...but in the TV world, a bedroom-sized OLED TV is kind of becoming the Holy Grail of AV. Which makes LG's CES announcement of the production of new 42-inch sized OLED TVs big news.

The premier TV technology has slowly been coming to smaller screens as its popularity has increased, with last year seeing LG, Sony, Philips and BeoVision rolling out 48-inch models. But the introduction of a 42-inch range is great on three fronts: first, it'll near-certainly bring the price of getting in on the ground floor of OLED TVs down; second, it'll make them suitable for bedroom / spare room TVs; and third, it makes them a realistic alternative to a high-end computer monitor for gaming, especially when the likes of LG includes Nvidia's G-sync variable refresh rate technology in its TVs, perfect for PC gaming with.

Right now the panels are still in development, with no word yet on what they'll look like once they're put in actual TV sets, nor which companies will be making them into consumer products - but our money is on LG getting there first.

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techradar.com