Broadband & TV
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/21/2019

Nickelodeon President Brian Robbins proudly asserts the relevance of his network as the company celebrates 40 years of children's programming with plans to expand its brands and digital content. Among the projects in development are movie versions of Nickelodeon shows for Netflix, new spin-off series from network favorites and reboots of classics such as "Rugrats" and "All That."

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Variety
3/21/2019

The Broadcast Engineering and Information Technology Conference at the 2019 National Association of Broadcasters Show will offer expert insights on new technologies that affect the broadcasting industry. "I hope delegates will come away having deepened their understanding of technologies critical to their personal skill sets and their employers' operations, and ideally also learned a few brand new things," says Skip Pizzi, NAB's vice president of technology education and outreach.

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TV Technology
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NAB, Skip Pizzi
3/21/2019

The Nebraska Broadcasters Association is doing its part to help victims of historic flooding in the state with a $20,000 donation to the local American Red Cross. NBA Board of Directors Chair and KETV President Ariel Roblin says broadcasters are happy to help where need exists, since they are also community members.

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Radio Ink
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American Red Cross, NBA
3/21/2019

The American Cable Association has rebranded itself and is now using the names ACA Connects and America's Communications Association, a change that reflects the industry's shift in focus from cable to broadband. "With this name change, we're recognizing that communication is the priority, not the medium," CEO Matt Polka said.

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Telecompetitor
3/21/2019

A recent study by Parks Associates reveals that consumer spending on subscription over-the-top TV services has not changed in three years, remaining at an average of nearly $8 a month. Changes may be looming, however, with new streamers entering the market, which could increase the number of streaming households, pull subscribers from leader Netflix or raise the average spending amount.

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Telecompetitor
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Parks Associates, Netflix
3/21/2019

Atlantic Broadband is rolling out its Enhanced WiFi to former MetroCast customers in several states, including Maine, Virginia and New Hampshire. "With today's launch of E-WiFi, our customers will have access to powerful technology that will take internet performance to new heights," says Vice President of Programming and Products Heather McCallion.

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Multichannel News
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Atlantic Broadband, MetroCast
3/21/2019

The new version of Rupert Murdoch's Fox, divested of its movie and TV properties, is ready to cover the news under the watchful eye of Lachlan Murdoch, who does not have his father's relationship with President Donald Trump. The company is also gearing up for a Washington, D.C., fight as it throws its lobbying weight behind a desired end to the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act Reauthorization.

3/21/2019

The Federal Communications Commission has adopted an order that opens up the "white spaces" between TV channels for use by computers and wireless devices as part of an effort to provide equitable digital access in rural areas. The National Association of Broadcasters has praised the FCC for making the inclusion of geolocation capabilities mandatory as part of a plan to minimize TV interference by white space devices.

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Multichannel News
3/21/2019

Beginning in May, Nielsen will replace its quarterly radio ratings diary with a system for continuous, rolling measurement that provides reports each month on the previous three months. The new system should allow broadcasters to be more responsive to changing audiences.

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Nielsen
3/21/2019

The Justice Department will host a workshop in May to educate antitrust officials on how TV mergers should be examined and rated when competition from technology companies is considered. The move comes as the Federal Communications Commission's Michael O'Rielly criticizes DOJ standards, saying that the department treats TV stations unfairly.