Wireless
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/4/2019

Motorola will expand beyond making mostly $500-and-under phones next year and produce more high-end devices, the company's Mobility President Sergio Buniac said. He pointed to new developments in camera quality and 5G, along with new Qualcomm Snapdragon processors, as key to Motorola's plans.

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CNET
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Qualcomm
12/4/2019

Qualcomm offered hints about development of a pair of 5G Snapdragon mobile platforms, the 865 and 765/765G, which the chipmaker said will help lead the growth of artificial intelligence and 5G. The company also said it will release a new version of its 3D Sonic Max fingerprint sensor, increasing the original size by 17 times.

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ZDNet, The Verge
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Qualcomm
12/3/2019

T-Mobile has lit up its 5G network, which covers more than 200 million people in upwards of 5,000 localities, using low-band 600 MHz spectrum, the carrier announced. Compatible handsets expected to hit the market on Friday -- Samsung's Galaxy Note10+ 5G and the OnePlus 7T Pro 5G McLaren -- and the network will originally deliver data speeds comparable to those of advanced LTE networks, but T-Mobile said download rates will eventually get faster.

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VentureBeat, Light Reading
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T-Mobile, Samsung
12/3/2019

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration's new Minority Broadband Initiative will start by examining possible projects in the Carolinas. The NTIA plans to expand on its existing connections to federal and state governments to serve communities near historically black colleges and universities.

12/3/2019

Supply chain data points to Apple releasing four iPhones that support 5G service in 2020, JPMorgan predicted, saying in a note that the company will likely introduce them later in the year in sizes ranging from 5.4 inches to 6.7 inches. The analysts also suggested that Apple may drop new iPhones in two steps from 2021 onward, in order to gain more flexibility and reduce seasonality issues.

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CNN, CNBC
12/2/2019

The government is considering adopting new rules aimed at eliminating loopholes that have allowed companies to continue shipping supplies to Huawei Technologies in the face of a Commerce Department ban restricting such sales, Reuters reports. The Chinese manufacturer is reportedly succeeding in building smartphones without US-made chips, however, using replacements from sources that include Taiwan, Japan and the Netherlands.

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Reuters
12/2/2019

The Justice Department has decided not to charge the GSM Association with violating antitrust laws following a two-year inquiry over whether the international wireless trade group and its members sought to control the standards-setting procedure for embedded subscriber identity modules to make it more difficult for customers to change providers. The DOJ said that GSMA agreed to alter the process for establishing eSIM card standards and include multiple industries in working groups.

12/2/2019

Lawmakers in both the Senate and the House have released a bipartisan measure aimed at stopping illegal robocalls, with congressional leaders predicting the House may approve the bill this week and send it on to the upper chamber. The Pallone-Thune TRACED Act would mandate that most telecom companies verify calls' origins, and that all carriers block robocalls at no extra cost to consumers.

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The Hill
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Senate
12/2/2019

AT&T is partnering with Purdue University on construction of an Indianapolis lab that will cater to researchers and entrepreneurs, the organizations announced. Bill Soards, president of AT&T's Indiana division, says that the Purdue Research Lab will conduct tests on expanding 5G uses in such areas as manufacturing and agriculture.

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Indiana Public Media
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Purdue University
11/27/2019

Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., has introduced a bill to tackle prominent issues regarding online privacy. The bill includes measures that would establish consumers' right to view their data and get it removed from company archives, would require companies to gain permission to gather sensitive information and would establish a privacy-focused unit within the Federal Trade Commission.

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CNBC, The Hill
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Sen. Maria Cantwell, Senate