ICYMI: Most read by educators

Does reading aloud benefit older students?

Many teachers stop reading aloud to students once they reach middle school, but research shows the practice continues to have benefits for students, including improved comprehension and reduced stress. Kasey Short, a middle-school language arts and social studies teacher, shares how she integrates this strategy with her students, including using the last five minutes of class to read aloud.

Full Story: Edutopia online

Are teachers learning what motivates students?

Some teachers may be entering the classroom without proper training on how to motivate students to learn, according to a study by the Mindset Scholars Network. One challenge is that research on such motivations often is separate from content-specific instructional practices that aspiring teachers are learning, says Lisa Quay, executive director of Mindset Scholars and co-author of the study.

Full Story: Education Week (tiered subscription model)

College Board to add "adversity score" to SAT results

The College Board will roll out a new initiative that applies an adversity score to SAT exam results, starting this fall, following a successful beta test with 50 institutions. The score considers 15 circumstances, including crime and poverty rates of students' neighborhoods, and will only be disclosed to the college or university during the application process.

Full Story: The Wall Street Journal (tiered subscription model)CNN

Report: Many teachers unprepared for students with disabilities

Many teachers lack adequate training to serve the needs of students with disabilities and English-language learners who spend time in general-education classrooms, researchers say. Experts suggest several methods for addressing this, including professional development that emphasizes reading and vocabulary-development skills and ensures that all teachers can understand individualized education programs.

Full Story: Education Week (tiered subscription model)

Studies show long-term benefits of preschool

Enrolling in high-quality preschool programs can improve outcomes for a student's siblings and their future children, according to studies from University of Chicago professor James Heckman. Findings show that enrollment in preschool was tied to successful education and employment as well as reduced involvement in crime.

Full Story: The Hechinger ReportChalkbeat

Audrey Altmann is an editorial assistant at SmartBrief.

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This "most read" feature reflects the most read items in ASCD SmartBrief from the previous week. Sign up for ASCD SmartBrief to get news like this in your inbox, or check out all of SmartBrief’s education newsletters, covering career and technical education, educational leadership, math education and more.